Song for Autumn

6786303-A-stack-of-firewood-covered-in-snow--Stock-PhotoBy Mary Oliver
 
In the deep fall
don’t you imagine the leaves think how
comfortable it will be to touch
the earth instead of the
nothingness of air and the endless
freshets of wind? And don’t you think
the trees themselves, especially those with mossy,
warm caves, begin to think
 
of the birds that will come — six, a dozen — to sleep
inside their bodies? And don’t you hear
the goldenrod whispering goodbye,
the everlasting being crowned with the first
tuffets of snow? The pond
vanishes, and the white field over which
the fox runs so quickly brings out
its blue shadows. And the wind pumps its
bellows. And at evening especially,
the piled firewood shifts a little,
longing to be on its way.

Wild Lectionary: Look to the Acorns

IMG_2956.JPG

Dark-eyed Junco
Photo Credit: Laurel Dykstra

Proper 28(33) A
Pentecost + 24

Matthew 25:14-30

By Ragan Sutterfield

I have been spending my mornings in the woods lately, a short hike before I begin to work on the tasks of the day. As fall finally arrives here in Arkansas the juncos have returned, twittering as they flash the white of their tails, and the long metallic notes of white-throated sparrows echo in the understory. Each step along the trails comes with a crunch, not only of the newly fallen leaves, but also of the acorns, cracking orange against the gray shale of the hillsides. Continue reading

It’s Time to Take Jesus Off the Pedestal

Lindsay GreyReyBy Tommy Airey, an excerpt from chapter nine of Descending Like a Dove: A Journey of Radical Discipleship (to be released Spring 2018)

Like every good Evangelical, my adolescent faith was about giving all glory to the Lord. I sang praise songs to a “high and lifted up” Jesus and always concluded my prayers “in Jesus’ name” (I signed off my emails “Fool For Christ,” but that’s a story for another time). I was taught to utilize “apologetics” to defend the faith and prove that Jesus was, in fact, Divine. I revered C.S. Lewis whose Mere Christianity made a water-tight case for my beliefs. Lewis left readers three choices for who Jesus really was: a lunatic, a liar or the Lord Himself:

Either this man was, and is, the Son of God, or else a madman or something worse. You can shut him up for a fool, you can spit at him and kill him as a demon or you can fall at his feet and call him Lord and God, but let us not come with any patronizing nonsense about his being a great human teacher.

Lewis claimed that, when it came to the people who actually met Jesus, they responded in three ways: hatred, terror or adoration. There was no middle ground. Continue reading

Fall Planting

images.jpgBy Rose Marie Berger (23 September 2017)
A poem on the feast day of St. Adamnan,
ninth abbot of Iona

Today, planted scarpered kale
liberated by Grace. Winter comes
to risen beds. Leafy tough, stolen,
abundant delight! Rogation prayers
go in with roots. Ilhui’s garden blessing
Lingers below purple basil, bible leaf,
Mary’s milkweed (for 3 monarchs,
should they arrive). Ilhuicamina
Long-limbed, beautiful, copal skin,
trusting palms
soles to seal the deal. These child-plantings
uprooted, transported, here.
Now let soil hold you. Continue reading

The Problem is the System Working the Way it is Supposed to

ChokeholdFrom author and legal analyst Paul Butler in a conversation with Michelle Alexander about his recent release Chokehold: Policing Black Men:

My Brother’s Keeper is a program for African-American boys and men, boys of color and men, Latinos and Native-American men as well. And, at this [Obama] White House ceremony, there were people you’d expect to be there, like, the major leaders of the civil rights organizations. And, some people who you might not expect, like, Mayor Bloomberg, Bill O’Reilly, a lot of people.
Continue reading

A Rare One

BerriganPhoto by Clancy Dunigan, a founding member of the Reagan-era Bartimaeus Community in Berkeley, CA.  Clancy lives on Whidbey Island in Washington state with his partner Marcia and hosts “Clancy’s Bar & Grill,” an award-winning blues radio show, every Thursday night on 90.7 KSER in Seattle.  Dunigan recently explained his shot of the late Daniel Berrigan:

 

For me, a rare one, as he looked into the camera. Usually I found Dan looking away or with eyes cast down.  The luck of the Irish we will call it.  We had just finished listening to Dan’s take on Isaiah in a tent outside the Nev. Test Site, at a Pacific Life Community gig.  Dan suggested we all take a walk into the desert, find a place to sit or stand and consider the Scripture, pray, and listen. This photo was taken after that, as folk returned to the tent.