Proceeding From The Heart

A written homily on this weekend’s lectionary Gospel passage (Matthew 15:10-28) by Tom Airey.

We must learn to regard people less in the light of what they do or omit to do, and more in the light of what they suffer.
Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Letters & Papers From Prison (70 years ago)

Religion gets messy and confusing when we become obsessed with our status before a judging Creator. Are there certain hoops we must jump through in order to be pure, clean & righteous? Is God pissed at us all until we perform the proper transaction, whether prayer or pilgrimage or penance? 500 years of Protestant faith has twisted this concept into even more confusion. We are “justified by faith alone,” the Reformers taught the world back in the 16th century and beyond. “Don’t try to work your way to Heaven,” my Evangelical teachers and pastors taught me during the last couple decades of the 20th century. It’s all about receiving grace, they kept assuring me.

But grace is cheap when it is simply flashed as a badge to meet requirements to be in the Presence of the Divine. Instead of the classic Protestant battle pitting “faith” versus “works,” in this Gospel episode Jesus schleps away any focus on outwardly ritualistic purity & cleanliness for a mission-oriented commitment to what “proceeds from the heart,” a lifestyle void of evil intentions, murder, adultery, fornication, theft, false witness, slander. Twice in Matthew’s Gospel Jesus quotes the prophet Hosea’s exhortation to “mercy” & an intimacy with God instead of sacrifices and burnt-offerings, classic attempts to curry favor with God over the generations.

Jesus’ focus on the heart was not an altar-call of pietistic regime-change, an invitation to make Jesus the personal Lord & Savior of our hearts. Instead, with the help of God’s strength, energy & wisdom, he was calling disciples to pledge allegiance to the hard work of getting to the root of our sin. This will take a mixture of mindfulness meditation & meetings, not miracles & magic. Prayer & daily surrender are important, but transformation doesn’t just happen. Jesus didn’t want to just forgive the symptoms. He yearned for a complete overhaul of the systems…To keep reading, go here.

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